The Paxos Travel Guide

© 2013 The Paxos Travel Guide - contact: email - info@paxostg.com

Paxos is the smallest of the Ionian islands and lies in the Ionian Sea about ten miles south of Corfu. It is just eight miles long and two miles wide and has, for the most part, escaped the effects of mass tourism.  


The population of approximately 2,500 is spread over the whole island in hamlets and villages, with about half the inhabitants living in the three main harbour villages of Gaios, Lakka and Loggos, all of which have retained their traditional Greek charm.





















Paxos is a really beautiful and relatively hilly island that resembles one vast garden densely covered with olive and tall pine trees, which together surround over 30 sheltered beaches with water that is clean and crystal clear. It is one of the greenest islands in Greece, even in mid-summer, and this is one of the many factors that attract people. Spring on the island is particularly colourful with many wild flowers and migrating birds.


The West Coast of the island is known as the 'wild coast', as it faces the open sea. It has cliffs, caves and grottos and can only be accessed by boat. The East Coast, by contrast, is usually very calm and is perfect for swimming and boating. It is dotted with small coves and bays with shingle and rocky beaches all the way from Lakka in the north right down to the southern tip. Many of the beaches are backed by wonderful olive groves that provide very welcome shade and are ideal for snorkelling and diving.



















The Paxos landscape is characterised by the 200,000 olive trees that cover the island and were originally brought to Paxos (as they were to Corfu) by the Venetians over 300 years ago. The oil produced is unique, as the olives are allowed to fully mature and fall from the trees, rather than being beaten off or hand picked. This leads to a longer season and you often see large black nets under the trees waiting for the olives to fall. The methods of production have hardly changed over the centuries and Paxos produces one of the finest olive oils in Greece.




















About a mile south of Paxos is the island of Anti Paxos. Anti Paxos is just a mile wide and two miles long but its wonderful sandy beaches with their turquoise blue water  are amongst the best in the whole of Greece and even rival those in the Caribbean. Inland, Anti Paxos is very different from its larger neighbour Paxos and is well worth exploring. The terrain is steep and uneven in places, and a network of narrow paths and tracks leads through the maquis and over the undulating countryside. Explorers pass orchards, vineyards and the walled gardens of the houses in the village of Vigla and then follow the path down to the small harbour of Agrapidia and the quiet coves in the south of the island.


Both Paxos and Anti Paxos have very purposely preserved a landscape and way of life that have changed relatively little in recent times.  Although modern life is now more in evidence, visitors are always captivated by its picturesque simplicity and easy pace of life.  During the summer Paxiots are involved in all aspects of the local tourist industry, whilst in the winter months, the olive harvest is their main source of income.


In addition to its beaches, Anti-Paxos is known chiefly for its wine, which is very good but difficult to find, as the locals tend to keep it for themselves. The island has no permanent inhabitants but the Paxiots have summer villas there and there are a few villas available for rent. Four tavernas near the beaches open during the summer season.  


THE GEOGRAPHY OF PAXOS

Sleeps 2-6:
Villa Stelios is a three-bedroom villa with sea views and private swimming pool within a few minutes’ walk of Loggos village and the beach. The villa occupies a wonderful vantage point at the top of the village and is a five minute walk down to Loggos harbour...
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Sleeps 1-2:
Fotini is a private one-bedroom cottage with sea views and outside terrace within a few minutes’ walk of the beach. In a quiet position at the top of Loggos village, it is a five minute walk to the village harbour, with its shops and tavernas…
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Fotini Cottage, Loggos

Sleeps 2-4:
The major part of an old village house which has been undergoing steady refurbishment in recent years, Villa Aglaia is a two-bedroom apartment with wonderful sea views, especially from its private terrace below...

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Aglaia Villa, Loggos

Sleeps 1-2:
The smaller part of an old village house which has been undergoing steady refurbishment in recent years, Aglaia studio is a one-bedroom apartment in a superb hillside position just a minute's walk from the village of Loggos and the beaches...
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Aglaia Studio, Loggos

Properties in and around the village of LOGGOS & MARMARI BEACH:

Sleeps 2-6:
Situated directly above Marmari beach and just a short stroll down through the olive groves, is Poseidon, a modern and beautifully finished three-bedroom villa with pool. The location makes this villa very convenient for nearby Loggos...
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Villa Poseidon, Loggos

Sleeps 2-4:
Right above Marmari beach is Amphritite, a modern two-bedroom villa with a private pool which has gorgeous views through the olive groves towards the sea. The location makes it very convenient for Marmari and nearby Levrechio beaches...
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Villa Amphitrite, Loggos

Stelios Villa, Loggos

Sleeps 1-2:
Nicola is a stone-built one-bedroom villa with sea views, terrace and private plunge pool, all within a few minutes’ walk of the beach. It occupies a wonderful vantage point at the top of Loggos village and is a five minute walk to the village harbour... read more

Holiday Accommodation on Paxos

Click Here for a List of Villas with pools & Apartments on Paxos…

Nicola, Loggos

Properties in and around the village of LOGGOS:

Special Offers
Villas with pools
& Apartments on Paxos…

Paxos is a really beautiful and relatively hilly island that resembles one vast garden densely covered with olive and tall pine trees, which together surround over 30 sheltered beaches with water that is clean and crystal clear. It is one of the greenest islands in Greece, even in mid-summer, and this is one of the many factors that attract people. Spring on the island is particularly colourful with many wild flowers and migrating birds.


The West Coast of the island is known as the 'wild coast', as it faces the open sea. It has cliffs, caves and grottos and can only be accessed by boat. The East Coast, by contrast, is usually very calm and is perfect for swimming and boating. It is dotted with small coves and bays with shingle and rocky beaches all the way from Lakka in the north right down to the southern tip. Many of the beaches are backed by wonderful olive groves that provide very welcome shade and are ideal for snorkelling and diving.


The Paxos landscape is characterised by the 200,000 olive trees that cover the island and were originally brought to Paxos (as they were to Corfu) by the Venetians over 300 years ago. The oil produced is unique, as the olives are allowed to fully mature and fall from the trees, rather than being beaten off or hand picked. This leads to a longer season and you often see large black nets under the trees waiting for the olives to fall. The methods of production have hardly changed over the centuries and Paxos produces one of the finest olive oils in Greece.



About a mile south of Paxos is the island of Anti Paxos. Anti Paxos is just a mile wide and two miles long but its wonderful sandy beaches with their turquoise blue water  are amongst the best in the whole of Greece and even rival those in the Caribbean. Inland, Anti Paxos is very different from its larger neighbour Paxos and is well worth exploring. The terrain is steep and uneven in places, and a network of narrow paths and tracks leads through the maquis and over the undulating countryside. Explorers pass orchards, vineyards and the walled gardens of the houses in the village of Vigla and then follow the path down to the small harbour of Agrapidia and the quiet coves in the south of the island.


Both Paxos and Anti Paxos have very purposely preserved a landscape and way of life that have changed relatively little in recent times.  Although modern life is now more in evidence, visitors are always captivated by its picturesque simplicity and easy pace of life.  During the summer Paxiots are involved in all aspects of the local tourist industry, whilst in the winter months, the olive harvest is their main source of income.


In addition to its beaches, Anti-Paxos is known chiefly for its wine, which is very good but difficult to find, as the locals tend to keep it for themselves. The island has no permanent inhabitants but the Paxiots have summer villas there and there are a few villas available for rent. Four tavernas near the beaches open during the summer season.