The Paxos Travel Guide

© 2013 The Paxos Travel Guide - contact: email - info@paxostg.com

Paxos is just eight miles long and two miles wide and you can therefore get around the island very easily, even on foot. An air-conditioned coach provides the local bus service that links the main villages of Gaios, Lakka and Loggos, as well as smaller villages such as Fontana and Magazia, several times a day and there are also five taxis. If you prefer a bit more independence, there are several car hire firms on the island and you can also hire scooters. Many visitors believe the best way to get around is by motor boat, six-seater skiffs with small outboard motors which can be hired from the main villages. With one of these it is easy to discover the numerous remote beaches of the east coast and there is also a varied range of excursions available. The marvellous sandy beaches of Anti-Paxos, the tiny sister island of Paxos, are best and most easily reached by the express sea taxis from Gaios.


Walking

Walking is the ideal way to explore Paxos, as the island is relatively small, hilly but not mountainous, and you can usually travel to or return from your walk by local bus. Paxos has a very extensive network of paths, tracks and donkey steps offering a wide choice of routes of varying length and difficulty, both along the coast and inland. Motorised traffic arrived on the island relatively late and so this network was until recently used on a daily basis by locals and visitors alike, meaning that, although there are more cars now, the network is mostly still intact, even if a trifle overgrown in places.




















Many visitors, even some staying in outlying villas, now forsake motorised transport in favour of walking, since not only are most properties no more than 25 minutes’ walk from the nearest beach, shop or taverna but the paths also lead through wonderful countryside, winding through silent olive groves over a carpet of wild flowers or along narrow lanes lined with dry stone walls which pass through abandoned or semi-abandoned villages. The paths may not always be well signed but finding new ways and paths is part of the fun and, with Paxos being such a small island, you are never far from a road or village where you can ask for directions. There is, however, now an excellent walking guide and map of the island available, The Bleasdale Walking Map of Paxos, which makes it much easier to find your way around, not only on foot but also by car.


The best time for a walking holiday is the early and late season when temperatures are more moderate and there is an abundance of wild flowers to be seen, especially in the spring. However, even if you are walking in mid-summer, once away from the beaches and open coastal paths, the inland tracks are shaded and much cooler for walkers, and there is often a gentle breeze rustling through the trees on the higher parts of the island.


If you do walk on Paxos, you will discover secret coves and unfrequented bays, spectacular views from majestic cliffs, and short-cuts through olive groves to the beaches, while at the same time being able to enjoy the island’s flora and fauna. You will also discover various sites of both architectural and historical interest: old Venetian houses, churches, shrines and windmills; ruined olive presses and deserted villages; the ‘sternas’ or stone reservoirs built by the British during their 50-year administration of Paxos from 1815; and even some British-built roads, such as the Old Military Road leading down into Loggos from just below Fontana.


About a mile south of Paxos is the island of Anti Paxos, which is very different from its larger neighbour and is well worth exploring. A network of narrow paths and tracks leads through the maquis and over the undulating countryside past orchards, vineyards and the walled gardens of the houses in the village of Vigla down to the small harbour of Agrapidia. Radovani Beach with its interesting off-shore rock formations and the quiet coves in the south of the island are also worth visiting. The terrain is steep and uneven in places and good walking shoes are recommended.




















For more detailed information about walking on Paxos, see the individual village descriptions.


Boat Hire

Many visitors believe that the best way to get around Paxos is to hire a motor boat and a wide selection of boats is available from Gaios, Lakka and Loggos. You do not need a licence to hire boats up to 30HP and you will be given some basic instruction; if you wish to hire a more powerful boat, you will need to produce evidence of your qualifications, usually an International Certificate of Competence (ICC). Having your own boat will give you much more freedom and will enable you to visit all the popular beaches on the East Coast, as well as discovering more remote ones. You can also sometimes take a boat down the West Coast and across to Anti Paxos but the weather can change very quickly and a strong wind pick up. In order to do this in safety, you therefore need to be very sure that the weather is settled and to return from Anti Paxos by early afternoon, as there is otherwise often a considerable swell on the way back to Paxos. Boats usually have to be returned to their place of rental each evening.




















Car hire

Hiring a car will give you considerable freedom and enable you to visit most parts of the island. There are several car hire firms on the island and a wide range of cars available, ranging from small saloon cars to open top jeeps and larger vehicles. However, in high season the demand for cars exceeds the supply so, if you wish to hire a car in July or August, you need to book this as soon as your plans are definite. The roads on Paxos have been considerably improved over the past few years, new roads have been built and roads that were previously un-surfaced have been surfaced. Even so, nearly all the roads are narrow in places and many are also quite steep and have large potholes or broken edges.  In common with elsewhere in Greece, your vehicle insurance does not cover you for any damage to the tyres, wheels or underside of the car. You need to be at least 23 years old and have held a full licence for at least a year to hire a car on Paxos.




















Scooter hire

You can also hire scooters from all the main villages. However, many of the island roads are steep and narrow in places, with frequent potholes or loose gravel. We therefore do not recommend scooter hire unless you are already an experienced rider. Wearing a helmet is compulsory.


Local Bus

An air-conditioned coach provides the local bus service that links the main villages of Gaios, Lakka and Loggos, as well as smaller villages such as Fontana and Magazia, several times a day. Fares are relatively cheap but there is no service after early evening, except in high season.


Taxis

There are still only five taxis on the island, which means that around the arrival and departure times of the hydrofoils and ferries, you can have a very long wait unless you have booked your taxi in advance. At other times taxis can be a very useful and fairly economical way of getting around the island, especially if there are several of you.


Excursions

No-one should visit Paxos without taking a trip to the West Coast to see the marvellous scenery and swim in the clear blue waters.  This is a stunning stretch of coastline with dramatic cliffs and huge sea caves, some of which have strikingly deep blue water and are large enough for a boat to enter. Among the most impressive of the caves are Ipapanti, where a submarine was reputedly hidden during the Second World War, and Ortholithos, which has a massive sentry stone at its entrance. The West Coast also boasts an incredible natural phenomenon, the Tripidos Arch, which is a huge arched rock formation.

Round-the-island trips, either by speedboat or more traditional caique, visiting the West Coast leave regularly from Gaios, Lakka and Loggos and most also include a visit to the adjacent island of Anti Paxos, where they usually spend a couple of hours. You can also take a trip just to Anti Paxos. The express boats that leave from in front of the main square in Gaios several times a day take just 15 minutes, or you can instead go by traditional caique which takes a little longer. There are also trips to Anti Paxos only from Lakka and Loggos. There are usually also evening boat trips to the islands of St Nicholas and Panagia to watch the sunset.



GETTING AROUND PAXOS

Click Here for a List of Villas with pools & Apartments on Paxos…

Sleeps 1-2:
Fotini is a private one-bedroom cottage with sea views and outside terrace within a few minutes’ walk of the beach. In a quiet position at the top of Loggos village, it is a five minute walk to the village harbour, with its shops and tavernas…
read more


Fotini Cottage, Loggos

Sleeps 2-4:
The major part of an old village house which has been undergoing steady refurbishment in recent years, Villa Aglaia is a two-bedroom apartment with wonderful sea views, especially from its private terrace below...

 read more


Aglaia Villa, Loggos

Sleeps 1-2:
The smaller part of an old village house which has been undergoing steady refurbishment in recent years, Aglaia studio is a one-bedroom apartment in a superb hillside position just a minute's walk from the village of Loggos and the beaches...
read more


Aglaia Studio, Loggos

Properties in and around the village of LOGGOS & MARMARI BEACH:

Sleeps 2-6:
Situated directly above Marmari beach and just a short stroll down through the olive groves, is Poseidon, a modern and beautifully finished three-bedroom villa with pool. The location makes this villa very convenient for nearby Loggos...
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Villa Poseidon, Loggos

Sleeps 2-4:
Right above Marmari beach is Amphritite, a modern two-bedroom villa with a private pool which has gorgeous views through the olive groves towards the sea. The location makes it very convenient for Marmari and nearby Levrechio beaches...
read more


Villa Amphitrite, Loggos

Sleeps 2-6:
Villa Stelios is a three-bedroom villa with sea views and private swimming pool within a few minutes’ walk of Loggos village and the beach. The villa occupies a wonderful vantage point at the top of the village and is a five minute walk down to Loggos harbour...
read more


Stelios Villa, Loggos

Sleeps 1-2:
Nicola is a stone-built one-bedroom villa with sea views, terrace and private plunge pool, all within a few minutes’ walk of the beach. It occupies a wonderful vantage point at the top of Loggos village and is a five minute walk to the village harbour... read more

Holiday Accommodation on Paxos

Click Here for a List of Villas with pools & Apartments on Paxos…

Nicola, Loggos

Properties in and around the village of LOGGOS:

Properties in and around the beach at MARMARI and walking distance of Loggos:

Sleeps 2-3:
Nicoletta is a rarity, a private cottage for two with its own small pool within easy walking distance of the sea. It is also one of several Paxiot properties whose owner Katina takes great pride in tending the gardens, which are abundant with mature trees, shrubs and exotic flowers and plants...
read more


Nicoletta Cottage, Marmari

Sleeps 1-2:
Tucked away in the olive groves just above Marmari beach is Katina Studio, a detached one-bedroom studio ideal for a couple. One of several properties in the area owned by local Paxiot Katina, this charming little white and yellow painted cottage enjoys a private location close to the sea and with access to the beaches...
read more


Katina Studio, Marmari

Sleeps 2-5:
Katina, a two-bedroom house with sea views and spacious outside areas, is a hidden gem just a short walk down a rugged path to Marmari beach. It is ideal for those who want privacy in the heart of the Paxos countryside…
read more


Katina Cottage, Marmari

Other Villas on Paxos:

Sleeps 2-4:
A charming example of a typical Greek house in the heart of the Paxiot community of Zernatika, Country House is a quiet two-bedroomed property tucked away off the beaten track, with its own pool and garden…
read more


Country House, Zernatika

Sleeps 2-6:
With three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a pool and a well-kept garden, Hortensia is a restful village property conveniently situated close to Loggos. It is just 10 minutes walk into Loggos or, down winding footpaths, to the sea at Kipos, Kipiadi and Marmari beaches...
read more


Villa Hortensia, Nr. Loggos

Click Here for a List of Special Offers on
Villas with pools & Apartments on the island of Paxos…

Many visitors, even some staying in outlying villas, now forsake motorised transport in favour of walking, since not only are most properties no more than 25 minutes’ walk from the nearest beach, shop or taverna but the paths also lead through wonderful countryside, winding through silent olive groves over a carpet of wild flowers or along narrow lanes lined with dry stone walls which pass through abandoned or semi-abandoned villages. The paths may not always be well signed but finding new ways and paths is part of the fun and, with Paxos being such a small island, you are never far from a road or village where you can ask for directions. There is, however, now an excellent walking guide and map of the island available, The Bleasdale Walking Map of Paxos, which makes it much easier to find your way around, not only on foot but also by car.


The best time for a walking holiday is the early and late season when temperatures are more moderate and there is an abundance of wild flowers to be seen, especially in the spring. However, even if you are walking in mid-summer, once away from the beaches and open coastal paths, the inland tracks are shaded and much cooler for walkers, and there is often a gentle breeze rustling through the trees on the higher parts of the island.


If you do walk on Paxos, you will discover secret coves and unfrequented bays, spectacular views from majestic cliffs, and short-cuts through olive groves to the beaches, while at the same time being able to enjoy the island’s flora and fauna. You will also discover various sites of both architectural and historical interest: old Venetian houses, churches, shrines and windmills; ruined olive presses and deserted villages; the ‘sternas’ or stone reservoirs built by the British during their 50-year administration of Paxos from 1815; and even some British-built roads, such as the Old Military Road leading down into Loggos from just below Fontana.


About a mile south of Paxos is the island of Anti Paxos, which is very different from its larger neighbour and is well worth exploring. A network of narrow paths and tracks leads through the maquis and over the undulating countryside past orchards, vineyards and the walled gardens of the houses in the village of Vigla down to the small harbour of Agrapidia. Radovani Beach with its interesting off-shore rock formations and the quiet coves in the south of the island are also worth visiting. The terrain is steep and uneven in places and good walking shoes are recommended.





For more detailed information about walking on Paxos, see the individual village descriptions.


Boat Hire

Many visitors believe that the best way to get around Paxos is to hire a motor boat and a wide selection of boats is available from Gaios, Lakka and Loggos. You do not need a licence to hire boats up to 30HP and you will be given some basic instruction; if you wish to hire a more powerful boat, you will need to produce evidence of your qualifications, usually an International Certificate of Competence (ICC). Having your own boat will give you much more freedom and will enable you to visit all the popular beaches on the East Coast, as well as discovering more remote ones. You can also sometimes take a boat down the West Coast and across to Anti Paxos but the weather can change very quickly and a strong wind pick up. In order to do this in safety, you therefore need to be very sure that the weather is settled and to return from Anti Paxos by early afternoon, as there is otherwise often a considerable swell on the way back to Paxos. Boats usually have to be returned to their place of rental each evening.


Car hire

Hiring a car will give you considerable freedom and enable you to visit most parts of the island. There are several car hire firms on the island and a wide range of cars available, ranging from small saloon cars to open top jeeps and larger vehicles. However, in high season the demand for cars exceeds the supply so, if you wish to hire a car in July or August, you need to book this as soon as your plans are definite. The roads on Paxos have been considerably improved over the past few years, new roads have been built and roads that were previously un-surfaced have been surfaced. Even so, nearly all the roads are narrow in places and many are also quite steep and have large potholes or broken edges.  In common with elsewhere in Greece, your vehicle insurance does not cover you for any damage to the tyres, wheels or underside of the car. You need to be at least 23 years old and have held a full licence for at least a year to hire a car on Paxos.



Scooter hire

You can also hire scooters from all the main villages. However, many of the island roads are steep and narrow in places, with frequent potholes or loose gravel. We therefore do not recommend scooter hire unless you are already an experienced rider. Wearing a helmet is compulsory.


Local Bus

An air-conditioned coach provides the local bus service that links the main villages of Gaios, Lakka and Loggos, as well as smaller villages such as Fontana and Magazia, several times a day. Fares are relatively cheap but there is no service after early evening, except in high season.


Taxis

There are still only five taxis on the island, which means that around the arrival and departure times of the hydrofoils and ferries, you can have a very long wait unless you have booked your taxi in advance. At other times taxis can be a very useful and fairly economical way of getting around the island, especially if there are several of you.


Excursions

No-one should visit Paxos without taking a trip to the West Coast to see the marvellous scenery and swim in the clear blue waters.  This is a stunning stretch of coastline with dramatic cliffs and huge sea caves, some of which have strikingly deep blue water and are large enough for a boat to enter. Among the most impressive of the caves are Ipapanti, where a submarine was reputedly hidden during the Second World War, and Ortholithos, which has a massive sentry stone at its entrance. The West Coast also boasts an incredible natural phenomenon, the Tripidos Arch, which is a huge arched rock formation.

Round-the-island trips, either by speedboat or more traditional caique, visiting the West Coast leave regularly from Gaios, Lakka and Loggos and most also include a visit to the adjacent island of Anti Paxos, where they usually spend a couple of hours. You can also take a trip just to Anti Paxos. The express boats that leave from in front of the main square in Gaios several times a day take just 15 minutes, or you can instead go by traditional caique which takes a little longer. There are also trips to Anti Paxos only from Lakka and Loggos. There are usually also evening boat trips to the islands of St Nicholas and Panagia to watch the sunset.