The Paxos Travel Guide

© 2013 The Paxos Travel Guide - contact: email - info@paxostg.com

The Ionian islands have a long history of occupation by foreign powers, as their strategic position has always made them desirable naval bases from which to attack mainland Greece, Italy and locations further east and west.  The fifth to the third century BC saw Athens and the Peloponnese in a long drawn out battle which greatly reduced the defences of the islands and in 230 BC the Romans were invited to take control of Corfu.  From here they expanded to Paxos and eventually the whole of the Ionian.  This period of Roman rule was a time of relative peace but following the death of Emperor Constantine, the Roman Empire was weakened and split into two camps: Romans and Goths.  The Goths were to rule over Corfu, Paxos and most of the Ionian islands for nearly 600 years, with only attacks by passing pirates patrolling the Ionian sea.


















The Normans invaded the islands in the latter part of the eleventh century and remained there until the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire sent in a fleet allied to the Venetians to reclaim the islands in 1147.  When the Byzantine Empire fell to the Crusaders in 1204, the Venetians made their claim on Corfu and Paxos.  Venice had a profound influence upon the Ionian islands, from architecture to education, fashions, art, music, medicine and food, and this is still much in evidence today.  It was the Venetians who brought the tomato to the island and instigated the huge programme of olive tree planting, paying a silver coin for each tree planted, in order to keep the peasants out of politics.


Napoleon captured Corfu and Paxos in 1789 but the French only occupied Paxos for a year before a Russian/Turkish fleet took control and declared the island part of the Eftanisos State - the State of the Seven Islands. The French regained control in 1803 and this resulted in war with the British, who by 1811 had taken control of Kakynthose, Kefalonia, Ithaca and Lefkas but never attacked Corfu and Paxos, although they blockaded them. Napoleon abdicated in 1812 and responsibility for running the Ionian islands was granted to the British, who instigated a programme of house, road and reservoir building, and improvements in drainage.




















By the beginning of the nineteenth century people on the Greek mainland wanted their independence and, joined by hundreds of men from Paxos, they fought against the Turks. They gained their independence in 1821 and this encouraged the islanders to rise up against their own foreign occupiers in a struggle that lasted over 40 years. The islands were finally joined to Greece after the Greek King had been deposed and in 1864 the London Protocole was signed stating that "the islands Corfu, Kefalonia, Zakynthos, Lefkas, Ithaca, Kythiara, Paxos and the other little ones are united with the Kingdom of Greece in order to be its part forever, in one and only state".


Corfu and Paxos officially declared a position of neutrality in the First World War.  However, at the beginning of the Second World War, Mussolini attacked Greece and, although he lost to a smaller Greek army, the Germans decided to take Greece. This they did rather quickly and ruthlessly and Greece was occupied by the Italians and the Nazis for most of the war.  The Italians were given administrative control of Corfu and Paxos in 1941 but this was seized back in 1943 with considerable bloodshed as Italian soldiers sided with Greek freedom fighters.  Liberation came with the advance of the Allied Forces in 1944.


Organised tourism first came to Paxos in the early 1980s and this, combined with fishing, the production of olive oil and the ability to be relatively self–sufficient and turn their hand to anything in order to survive, is the way of life on Paxos today.


THE HISTORY OF PAXOS

Click Here for a List of Villas with pools & Apartments on Paxos…

Sleeps 2-6:
Villa Stelios is a three-bedroom villa with sea views and private swimming pool within a few minutes’ walk of Loggos village and the beach. The villa occupies a wonderful vantage point at the top of the village and is a five minute walk down to Loggos harbour...
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Stelios Villa, Loggos

Sleeps 1-2:
Nicola is a stone-built one-bedroom villa with sea views, terrace and private plunge pool, all within a few minutes’ walk of the beach. It occupies a wonderful vantage point at the top of Loggos village and is a five minute walk to the village harbour... read more

Sleeps 1-2:
Fotini is a private one-bedroom cottage with sea views and outside terrace within a few minutes’ walk of the beach. In a quiet position at the top of Loggos village, it is a five minute walk to the village harbour, with its shops and tavernas…
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Fotini Cottage, Loggos

Sleeps 2-4:
The major part of an old village house which has been undergoing steady refurbishment in recent years, Villa Aglaia is a two-bedroom apartment with wonderful sea views, especially from its private terrace below...

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Aglaia Villa, Loggos

Sleeps 1-2:
The smaller part of an old village house which has been undergoing steady refurbishment in recent years, Aglaia studio is a one-bedroom apartment in a superb hillside position just a minute's walk from the village of Loggos and the beaches...
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Aglaia Studio, Loggos

Holiday Accommodation on Paxos

Click Here for a List of Villas with pools & Apartments on Paxos…

Nicola, Loggos

Properties in and around the village of LOGGOS:

Properties in and around the village of LOGGOS & MARMARI BEACH:

Sleeps 2-6:
Situated directly above Marmari beach and just a short stroll down through the olive groves, is Poseidon, a modern and beautifully finished three-bedroom villa with pool. The location makes this villa very convenient for nearby Loggos...
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Villa Poseidon, Loggos

Sleeps 2-4:
Right above Marmari beach is Amphritite, a modern two-bedroom villa with a private pool which has gorgeous views through the olive groves towards the sea. The location makes it very convenient for Marmari and nearby Levrechio beaches...
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Villa Amphitrite, Loggos

Properties in and around the beach at MARMARI and walking distance of Loggos:

Sleeps 2-3:
Nicoletta is a rarity, a private cottage for two with its own small pool within easy walking distance of the sea. It is also one of several Paxiot properties whose owner Katina takes great pride in tending the gardens, which are abundant with mature trees, shrubs and exotic flowers and plants...
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Nicoletta Cottage, Marmari

Special Offers
Villas with pools
& Apartments on Paxos…

The Normans invaded the islands in the latter part of the eleventh century and remained there until the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire sent in a fleet allied to the Venetians to reclaim the islands in 1147.  When the Byzantine Empire fell to the Crusaders in 1204, the Venetians made their claim on Corfu and Paxos.  Venice had a profound influence upon the Ionian islands, from architecture to education, fashions, art, music, medicine and food, and this is still much in evidence today.  It was the Venetians who brought the tomato to the island and instigated the huge programme of olive tree planting, paying a silver coin for each tree planted, in order to keep the peasants out of politics.


Napoleon captured Corfu and Paxos in 1789 but the French only occupied Paxos for a year before a Russian/Turkish fleet took control and declared the island part of the Eftanisos State - the State of the Seven Islands. The French regained control in 1803 and this resulted in war with the British, who by 1811 had taken control of Kakynthose, Kefalonia, Ithaca and Lefkas but never attacked Corfu and Paxos, although they blockaded them. Napoleon abdicated in 1812 and responsibility for running the Ionian islands was granted to the British, who instigated a programme of house, road and reservoir building, and improvements in drainage.



By the beginning of the nineteenth century people on the Greek mainland wanted their independence and, joined by hundreds of men from Paxos, they fought against the Turks. They gained their independence in 1821 and this encouraged the islanders to rise up against their own foreign occupiers in a struggle that lasted over 40 years. The islands were finally joined to Greece after the Greek King had been deposed and in 1864 the London Protocole was signed stating that "the islands Corfu, Kefalonia, Zakynthos, Lefkas, Ithaca, Kythiara, Paxos and the other little ones are united with the Kingdom of Greece in order to be its part forever, in one and only state".


Corfu and Paxos officially declared a position of neutrality in the First World War.  However, at the beginning of the Second World War, Mussolini attacked Greece and, although he lost to a smaller Greek army, the Germans decided to take Greece. This they did rather quickly and ruthlessly and Greece was occupied by the Italians and the Nazis for most of the war.  The Italians were given administrative control of Corfu and Paxos in 1941 but this was seized back in 1943 with considerable bloodshed as Italian soldiers sided with Greek freedom fighters.  Liberation came with the advance of the Allied Forces in 1944.


Organised tourism first came to Paxos in the early 1980s and this, combined with fishing, the production of olive oil and the ability to be relatively self–sufficient and turn their hand to anything in order to survive, is the way of life on Paxos today.